Baritone

There are usually 4 types of Baritone voice, being:

Lyric Baritone

Dramatic Baritone

Bass Baritone

Choir Baritone

The Baritone is the most common of male voices, and has a much darker and heavier tone than the Tenor. With less flexibility and suppleness than the Tenor, the Baritone is nonetheless an important section within the vocal family, and is provides much of the "heavy lifting" required in Male voice section writing.

Lyric Baritone

The Lyric Baritone is capable of a lighter tone and more flexibility than the other members of the Baritone family, nearer to that of Tenors, but lacks the range to be considered a true Tenor voice. Nonetheless, it is the most commonly used voice for lead roles in musical theatre, and fills an important role in providing inner voices in Male choir harmonic writing.  The Lyric Baritone is not generally as powerful as the Dramatic Baritone, but with it's gentler tone provides an important support and vocal foundation when used in close harmony with the Tenors, at a softer dynamic. Parts higher in pitch written for Baritone sections suit the Lyric Baritone very well, as it can give impetus without the heavy, almost ponderous tone of the Dramatic or Bass Baritone, instead using its flexibility as an ideal countermelody or melodic harmony for the Tenors.

Dramatic Baritone

If the Baritone is the most commonly found male voice, then the Dramatic Baritone is the commonly found member of the Baritone family. Lacking the range of the Tenor, or Lyric Baritone, the Dramatic Baritone more than makes up for this limitations with power, and stamina. If a composer writes a Baritone in the middle register he can, more or less, expect power on tap, and use musical devices like swells and sustained lines with confidence. The Dramatic Baritone is generally the most balanced of the family across it's range, and this can highly useful for abrupt dynamic changes, or sudeden changes in pitch. Good vocal writing principals lead us to write fairly close intervals, or pitch changes for voice, but should the composer desire something more adventurous, then the Baritone may suit his or her intentions.

Bass Baritone

The Bass Baritone has most of the characteristics of the Dramatic Baritone. but usually has a lower range, and a darker tone. And that tone can lead the listener to think the Bass Baritone is singer lower than is actually the case. This voice has strong lower register, with less power than the Dramatic Baritone in the upper register.

One could consider the Bass Baritone to be the bottom 2 Cello strings, as an instrumental comparison, and taking into account normal voice writing, will often fill this comparitive role.